February 20, 2017

Texas Honor Days

The DRT promotes the celebration of Texas Honor Days. Members are encouraged to fly the Texas flag on each of these Honor Days.
DateHonor DayDescription
January 26Mirabeau B. Lamar DayMirabeau B. Lamar is honored as Texas’ Father of Education. Lamar served as second President of the Republic of Texas from 1838 to 1841. During his administration Congress granted each of the existing 23 counties four leagues of land to be used for education and set aside fifty leagues of land for the development of a university. Lamar supported the Homestead Act of 1839 and during his term the Lone Star flag and State seal were officially adopted. For more on information, please click the following link: Mirabeau B. Lamar
February 19Texas Statehood Day [February 19, 1846]The legal entry of Texas into the Union was 29 December 1845, but the decade-old Republic of Texas did not formally transfer the authority to the new State of Texas until 19 February 1846.

The Texans had until the end of the year in 1845 to accept the annexation as one of the states of the United States of America. They waited until 29 December 1845 to accept the terms, independent to the end. The formal transfer of authority from the Republic of Texas took place 19 February 1846 at the log capitol in Austin with President Anson Jones presiding. On this day we celebrate the end of the Republic of Texas.
March 2Texas Independence & Flag Day [March 2,1836]On this date, the Texas Declaration of Independence was signed at Washington-on-the-Brazos. The 59 signers met in a large frame blacksmith shop with only cotton cloth over the window openings to keep the cold out Sam Houston was there along with 58 other representatives, 52 of which were American-born. Many of the signers wished to be at the battlefields, but Houston convinced the signers that this declaration would give them some basis of legality and would help draw more help from the United States

This day was also Sam Houston's birthday. He was born on this date in 1793 in Virginia. He went on to become Governor of Tennessee, hero of the Texas Revolution, twice President of the Republic of Texas and a U.S. Senator.
March 6Alamo Heroes Day [March 6, 1836]On this date in 1836 the siege of the Alamo was ended when Santa Anna’s forces stormed the Alamo and killed all of the defenders. When you hear the cry “Remember the Alamo,” this is the day that prompted that cry. The newly renovated Long Barrack Museum is the site where the bloodiest hand-to-hand fighting occurred. The names of those defenders who died that day are recorded on a granite memorial.

Annually the Alamo Mission Chapter holds an observance at the Alamo to honor the patriots who died there.
March 27Goliad Heroes Day [March 27, 1836]Following the fall of the Alamo, the Mexican Army, under the command of General Santa Anna, attacked Colonel James W. Fannin’s men at Goliad. Fannin was forced to surrender. On March 27, 1836, 320 prisoners were executed, the largest loss of life in the cause of Texas independence. “Remember Goliad!” became one of the great battle cries at San Jacinto.
March 1 - 31Texas History Month (enacted by State Legislature 20 June 2003)
April 21 San Jacinto Day [April 21, 1836] On this date, General Sam Houston and the Texas Army defeated Santa Anna’s Mexican troops in the Battle of San Jacinto. The battle of San Jacinto occurred in mid-afternoon and lasted eighteen minutes. An annual celebration is held at the San Jacinto Monument and Battlefield where wreathes of flowers are laid at the foot of the monument in memory of those who fought and died there. The monument rising, 570 feet, is tallest monument in the world.

An Annual Pilgrimage is held in San Antonio by the Alamo Mission Chapter to celebrate the occasion on the first Monday of Fiesta Week that includes San Jacinto Day.
September 18Texas Heroes Day The Daughters of the Republic of Texas recognize Texas military heroes on September 18th. DRT has designated this day to honor and preserve the memory of the volunteer soldiers who died defending the Republic and to pay tribute to the men and women of the military, both past and present, who serve Texas. Special emphasis is placed on honoring those who died in the Mier Expedition and the Dawson Massacre.

On Sept. 18, 1842, 36 volunteer Texan soldiers were killed on the field of battle in the Dawson Massacre. The battle took place near Salado Creek, a few miles northeast of San Antonio, during a second invasion of the Mexican army. Three survivors escaped to tell the story, and 15 others were taken prisoner by Mexican soldiers and marched to Perote Prison in Veracruz, Mexico.
3rd Saturday in SeptemberTexian Navy DayIn September 1835, the first naval engagement of the Texas Revolution occurred near Velasco. In that engagement between a Texian privateer, the San Felipe, and a Mexican war schooner, the Correo, the Mexican ship was forced to unconditionally surrender.
October 2Gonzales Day [October 2, 1835]The first recognized battle of the Texas Revolution was fought in Gonzales. The Texas force of one hundred and sixty men challenged the Mexican military by refusing to surrender a brass cannon previously given to the town as a means of protection against the Indians. The Battle of Gonzales lasted only a few minutes, but most citizens in Texas realized that there was no turning back. A war had begun.
November 3Stephen F. Austin’s Birthday [November 3, 1793]Known as the Father of Texas, Stephen F. Austin carried on his father, Moses’ work to establish the first Texas Anglo-American Colony “The Old 300,” by bringing 300 families to a part of Mexico in what is now known as Texas. Austin was imprisoned in a Mexican jail for defending the colonist’s rights. He was a man of patience and diplomacy, a “thinker,” who made things happen. Each year a celebration is held at the site of his death in Brazoria County.
November 6The DRT Founders Day [November 6, 1891]On this date, a group of ladies met in Houston in the home of Mrs. Andrew Briscoe to carry out the idea of Misses Betty Ballinger and Hally Bryan for organizing a Republic of Texas daughters’ organization to meet with the Texas Veterans.
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